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What role for Citizen Led Learning Assessments? – Moving beyond Measurement

The contribution of citizen led learning assessments (CLLA) in which community organisations conduct simple reading and/or math evaluations has rightly been celebrated. A new Results for Development Report(R4D) provides insight into their strengths, limitations and most importantly makes practical pointers on how they can be improved.

Why Citizen-Led Assessments of Educational Outcomes Matter for the Transparency and Open Data Communities

This week, Results for Development’s education team published a multi-year effort assessing the effectiveness and impact of citizen-led education assessments of student learning. The various initiatives and campaigns (“CLAs” for short) are part of a vanguard effort in the education and transparency communities to leverage volunteer-led testing

Why are citizen led learning assessments not having an impact on home soil – and how can we change that?

Citizen-led learning assessments have been one of the most internationally influential educational initiatives of the decade. However, what of impact in their home countries? This blog is written on ASER India’s tenth birthday, prompting us to celebrate its success but also look to the future. ASER in India has been ground-breaking, inspiring participatory learning assessments across the globe:

Bringing Learning to Light: The Role of Citizen-led Assessments in Shifting the Education Agenda

The Hewlett Foundation supported Results for Development Institute in this evaluation of citizen-led assessments of learning. The Foundation’s Global Development and Population Program has funded citizen-led assessments as a central part of our Quality Education in Developing Countries Initiative and continues to do so as a way of measuring children’s basic reading and math abilities

Read India – When ‘scale’ met ‘system’

Pratham is one of India’s largest non-governmental organisations working in education. Annually since 2005, Pratham has been facilitating the ASER survey[1] that provides information on schooling and basic learning from all rural districts in India. Since inception ASER has been highlighting the poor levels of reading and arithmetic skills of children aged 5 to 16. To address this problem, in 2007 Pratham launched the Read India program to demonstrate what could be done to improve children’s basic learning on scale.

VIDEO: Measuring the learning progress of all children – Panel discussion

As a new set of education goals are drafted, improving quality and learning is likely to be more central to the post-2015 global development agenda. One important question to ask is – how can we measure the learning progress of all children? Ten years ago, citizens in India started using basic reading and arithmetic tools at home to systematically assess for themselves what their children are able to do.

Involving Citizens in the Provision of Good Quality Education

In January, I was honored to be present as the Pratham family celebrated the 10th anniversary of its Annual Status of Education Report (ASER). I learned that ASER means impact in Hindi. Having followed its progress closely over the years, I can only confirm that ASER is fulfilling the vision and promise of its name.

ASER – an experience to relish forever

It was the late summer of 2006 when I had my first ASER exercise to deliver. Working with Pratham had made me aware of those weaker students who get left behind in a classroom and of the importance of learning assessments. The ASER quest to figure out the learning levels of children fuelled my interest in travelling to reach places with varied landscapes and cultures.

The two stories of ASER

We are now 10 years into ASER, and real sense of momentum is building within me. I want to thank all the partner organisations and supporters in Bihar who have helped to make ASER a reality. Stories can inspire action and there are two such stories I want to share with all of you. One story made me very happy and hopeful while the other made me feel sad but, at the same time, taught me to accept some realities of working in the social sector.