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Citizen-led educational monitoring shows promise

According to a review undertaken by Charlotte Waters at the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER), the citizen-led approach being used in India, Mali, Senegal, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda is yielding reliable information about children’s basic learning levels, measuring change in these levels and raising awareness of local issues.

Does #blacklivesmatter matter? Does citizen monitoring make change?

I used to debate with my former Gates Foundation colleague Manami about the importance of #blacklivesmatter. Essentially, I took the Hilary Clinton stance: without specific policy proposals, it wouldn’t lead to real change.

Le voyage d’apprentissage du Réseau PAL : De l’évaluation à l’action !

50 militants innovateurs du domaine de l’education issus de 15 pays du Sud, se sont réunis la semaine dernière sur les rives scintillantes de la ville balnéaire de Saly sur la Petite Côte du Sénégal, afin d’examiner la prochaine étape cruciale de leur parcours d’apprentissage, lors de la 4ème réunion annuelle du Réseau PAL.

The PAL Network Learning Journey: Beyond Assessment to Action!

On the sparkling shores of the seaside town of Saly on the Petite Côte of Senegal, 50 ambitious education activists and innovators from 15 Global South countries convened last week to explore the next crucial stage of their learning journey at the 4th Annual PAL Network meeting.

Senegal: Gap in children’s education surmountable – ASER

The head of the Indian wing of the ASER Rukmini Banerji has expressed optimism that the gap between expectations and the current situation of children’s education in her country and elsewhere would be eventually plugged with greater involvement by Pal Network and other partners.

A People’s Global Network on Learning is Born

While Kenya and Nairobi were at a standstill preparing for the US President Barack Obama’s Airforce I to land on July 24 for the Global Entrepreneurship Summit, in another beautiful scenic setting, a global network on learning was born! The network will help hold countries accountable for ensuring their children are not just in school, but also learning. Committed to transparently conducting citizen-led household based assessments on learning, the network will increasingly enable communities to hold their leaders to account; it will support the call for lifelong learning for all – central to the new SDG on education.

What the data revolution looks like on the ground

There’s no question that the potential of the ‘data revolution’ first described in the U.N.’s “A World that Counts” report has captured the imagination of the international development community, especially data-wonks and donors concerned with how the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals will be measured. In the many discussions that have ensued, a consistent theme has been an aspiration to realize the potential of ‘non-traditional data sources.’

Why are citizen led learning assessments not having an impact on home soil – and how can we change that?

Citizen-led learning assessments have been one of the most internationally influential educational initiatives of the decade. However, what of impact in their home countries? This blog is written on ASER India’s tenth birthday, prompting us to celebrate its success but also look to the future. ASER in India has been ground-breaking, inspiring participatory learning assessments across the globe:

Bringing Learning to Light: The Role of Citizen-led Assessments in Shifting the Education Agenda

The Hewlett Foundation supported Results for Development Institute in this evaluation of citizen-led assessments of learning. The Foundation’s Global Development and Population Program has funded citizen-led assessments as a central part of our Quality Education in Developing Countries Initiative and continues to do so as a way of measuring children’s basic reading and math abilities

Friday Note: A test of the commitment to access plus learning

The bell has rung. Civil society leaders from India, Pakistan, Senegal, Mali, Nigeria, Mexico, Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania have come together, with optimism and conviction, asking others to join a movement to ensure that all children learn the fundamental, life-changing skills of reading and arithmetic.