Entradas

A stepping-stones approach to leaving no one behind in learning

To ensure the rhetoric of leaving no one behind becomes a reality, the sustainable development goals give rise to an important practical question: how can we monitor progress to ensure we know if we have been successful?

Continuing the Conversation about ‘The Role of Citizen-led Assessments in Shifting the Education Agenda’

In June, we shared findings from an evaluation of citizen-led assessments we commissioned from Results for Development. Since the report’s publication, which showed how engaging citizens in large scale, household-based assessments of children’s learning can help focus education debates on learning, a number of colleagues have shared their own perspectives on the evaluation

A People’s Global Network on Learning is Born

While Kenya and Nairobi were at a standstill preparing for the US President Barack Obama’s Airforce I to land on July 24 for the Global Entrepreneurship Summit, in another beautiful scenic setting, a global network on learning was born! The network will help hold countries accountable for ensuring their children are not just in school, but also learning. Committed to transparently conducting citizen-led household based assessments on learning, the network will increasingly enable communities to hold their leaders to account; it will support the call for lifelong learning for all – central to the new SDG on education.

Building a Movement – Assessment to Action

The recent publication of a report evaluating the family of citizen led assessments has led to a number of blogs that are looking closely at the learnings from these efforts and trying to understand the implications of what has been achieved and what has not

How ordinary citizens transformed the education agenda

The ultimate measure of success in education is not whether or not children attend school, but whether they learn. And creating a system in which learning is valued requires finding out what children are learning and building broad awareness about it. It was these two principles that inspired the organization Pratham in India to mobilize and train volunteers to conduct household surveys of children’s learning.

Friday Note: Making the Movement for Accountability and Learning

In his three-minute TED Talk, Derek Sivers tells us that a movement is made not by charismatic leaders but rather by the first followers. It is the people who are alert to a new idea, who are inspired to leave their comfortable routine, and who adopt and adapt an innovation—these are the movement makers.

Involving Citizens in the Provision of Good Quality Education

In January, I was honored to be present as the Pratham family celebrated the 10th anniversary of its Annual Status of Education Report (ASER). I learned that ASER means impact in Hindi. Having followed its progress closely over the years, I can only confirm that ASER is fulfilling the vision and promise of its name.

Learning for All – A New Paradigm for the Sustainable Development Goals

Experience has shown that simply being in school does not automatically translate into learning for students. As we enter this new phase of global goal setting for education, UNESCO, through its Institute for Statistics, has initiated a very timely online consultation about indicators that might be used to monitor learning around the world.

Let’s remake the classroom

The 10th edition of the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) by Pratham, released last week, shows that over the last decade, basic learning levels for children in elementary school in India have remained low. Only about half of Class V children in rural India can read a simple Class II level text, and a similar proportion can do a two-digit subtraction problem with borrowing.

Bitten off more than we could chew?

It is the tenth year of ASER – where did the time go? As usual, we’ve all been in the office, trying to beat the January release deadline. But this year, because of the tenth year anniversary, there is more excitement, more frenetic activity and, of course, more work, to bring out not 1, not 2, but 3 reports!